#1 July 26, 2013 13:35:00

JGS
Registered: 2012-02-22
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Using up that exported power


Keith is quite right to say that a device to use exported energy to heat hot water will pay for itself in a remarkably short time. 


However, such devices are expensive. Go and read the link below and links therein which describes how to build your own device. It's a bit daunting at first. However it is perfectly possible. I have built my own Mk2iPVRouter and it works perfectly. I have spent about  £100 on mine.  Anybody who has dabbled in DIY electronics should find it a doddle.


http://openenergymonitor.org/emon/node/1681








Edited JGS (July 26, 2013 13:35:00)

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#2 July 28, 2013 23:26:00

default
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Using up that exported power


So how long is a “remarkably short time” in your case?





Edited default (July 28, 2013 23:26:00)

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#3 July 30, 2013 18:47:00

JGS
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Using up that exported power


OK.  





So far I have not used anything but Solar PV to heat the hot water tank since April.  I use about 2 kWh each day to get it to a temperature of about 55 C when the thermostat on the immersion cuts out - usually by 11.00am each morning.  Obviously I won't manage this in the depths of winter but for the sake of argument suppose I achieve this on 200 days per year. 2 kWh is about 20p worth of electricity. 200 x 20 = £40. So the payback is about £40 p.a. and this means the payback time is about 2.5 years. 


I call that a very good rate of return.





If you have a bigger hot water tank then ……





Edited JGS (July 30, 2013 18:47:00)

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#4 July 30, 2013 19:15:00

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Using up that exported power


Thats an excellent return!





Edited default (July 30, 2013 19:15:00)

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#5 Aug. 13, 2013 09:33:00

bhommels
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Using up that exported power


I went the openenergy route about two summers ago (and never looked back). Using the ‘energy tracker’ function from my supplier, and by looking at the bills, the annual savings are at least £ 80, and more likely around £ 100 in electricity. Pretty good ROI indeed, as the device has cost me less than £ 100 to build.





Edited bhommels (Aug. 13, 2013 09:33:00)

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