#1 April 24, 2013 21:24:00

rogerhoward
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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


Even without Solar PV, electric vehicles are really cheap per mile compared to petrol/deisel, right? And no vehicle tax.


At present there is limited funding available for free installation of domestic Chargemaster vehicle recharging points: https://www.parkatmyhouse.com/ev-charging/faq . Location is NOT restricted to London as you might read. As regards the associated parking arrangements, you can specify availability times, days, excluded periods, etc however restricted you want.


A logical part of a PV'd property?


It'll be a while before the secondhand prices of electric vehicles are down to my type of level. But then they do say “be prepared”.










Economy 10 tariff provides 6.9p/kWh off-peak import between 12am-5am, 1pm-4pm and 8pm-10pm; http://www.pvoutput.org/aggregate.jsp?id=21047&sid=18934&v=2&t=m on approx. 63% off-peak usage, 22% solar usage, and 15% peak-rate usage.
1,900kWh annually is exported, mostly in summer, on approx. 3,200kWh generation. Approx. 4,500kWh/year is imported, mostly for (a) winter and springtime off-peak Storage Heaters, and (b) off-peak hot water Immersion heating (which is “dumb”, i.e. not linked to the solar PV).
PV array is split East-West. Income is from Phase II 21p/kWh Feed-in-Tariff plus smart metered 3.2p/kWh Export Tariff.

Edited rogerhoward (April 24, 2013 21:24:00)

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#2 April 24, 2013 22:11:00

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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


Solar Vehicle (Nissan Leaf) cost around 3p a mile to run. My present diesel Golf costs 12p. There is no need for a fancy charger. The car comes with a standard 13A plug which charges the car fully within 8 hours. A new Leaf has just been announced which is cheaper,  and has various ways to either purchase or lease the battery over 5 years. There is a new guarantee on the  deterioation of the battery. The electric car industry seems to be getting there.





Edited default (April 24, 2013 22:11:00)

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#3 April 29, 2013 23:41:00

phoenix
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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


Those figures have to be fuel costs only - not true running costs.  Two years ago, the Nissan Leaf was the most expensive family size car in running costs (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/columnists/mike-rutherford/8696300/Mr-Money-Pence-per-mile-is-what-matters-most-for-motorists.html).  Things have changed a bit with more government incentives, improvements in the new Leaf (maximum range, battery leasing options) but if you factor in the depreciation in value, for most people the decision to purchase remains more of a lifestyle choice rather than an economic one.





Edited phoenix (April 29, 2013 23:41:00)

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#4 May 9, 2013 08:25:00

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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


I totally agree pheonix.  There is no value for money “slant”. It's just a bit of a luxury.





Edited default (May 9, 2013 08:25:00)

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#5 April 18, 2014 07:43:00

rogerhoward
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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


Oh dear, this seems reminiscent of all yesteryear's prejudiced slating of solar power - especially when the traditionally anti-solar ‘Telegraph’ is used as a supposedly unbiased authority on the subject.


Nissan Leaf's haven't yet dropped below £10k - the clue was in the word ‘secondhand’ - but they've only been around 3 years so far. http://www.autotrader.co.uk/search/used/cars/nissan/leaf


Without Car Tax, our 5000 miles/year by an EV would probably cost about 600kWh/year (£80) of grid electric plus 600kWh/year of solar. That compares with our current £1000/year of high emissions motoring.


What many folks find it difficult to afford these days is the inflated cost of high emissions motoring. Fair enough though if you're one of those who can afford it and have a particular fascination with the internal combustion engine (a notably inefficient invention) and all the repair/running costs of it's more elaborate mechanisms.


I've gone for a solar-friendly 3kW charging point rather than a faster-charging 6kW variety. London is normally a guide to the future, and there you can already see many of the available parking places being given over to electric charging points, and with plans to further withdraw parking to high emissions vehicles as the solution to congestion.


In this urban environment I expect the charging point here to be equal to the Solar PV in the longer-term effect on the property price.


I hope the fund isn't now exhausted for these free installations.


A PV-less neighbour of mine with a 6kW home charging point is currently touring the other side of the country, Wales (okay, another country entirely). He would not have been able to afford to do it by high emissions motoring, and didn't previously have a car at all. With his £10 Ecotricity card he's recharging his Leaf for free as he goes with a fuel economy of 4.1miles/kWh. Track his realtime progress yourselves,  or on Twitter.







Economy 10 tariff provides 6.9p/kWh off-peak import between 12am-5am, 1pm-4pm and 8pm-10pm; http://www.pvoutput.org/aggregate.jsp?id=21047&sid=18934&v=2&t=m on approx. 63% off-peak usage, 22% solar usage, and 15% peak-rate usage.
1,900kWh annually is exported, mostly in summer, on approx. 3,200kWh generation. Approx. 4,500kWh/year is imported, mostly for (a) winter and springtime off-peak Storage Heaters, and (b) off-peak hot water Immersion heating (which is “dumb”, i.e. not linked to the solar PV).
PV array is split East-West. Income is from Phase II 21p/kWh Feed-in-Tariff plus smart metered 3.2p/kWh Export Tariff.

Edited rogerhoward (April 18, 2014 07:43:00)

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#6 April 19, 2014 11:32:00

Capetown
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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


rogerhoward I know what you mean about the “Torygraph”!  I accept your figures for 5000 miles for the EV, they are a bit conservative I'd say making it a bit better for the EV's case. For £1000 I would recon to get 6400 miles (that includes a deduction of £225 for road tax, and assuming insurance and servicing are equal). Your neighbour is getting a mile for 3.3p which compares favourably with   the 12p/mile  of my diesel golf. I'd need to have a second car for longer journeys and coupled with the higher depreciation costs and uncertainties about the battery, I'll pass this time! Which EV are you considering? 







The gene pool has no lifeguard!

Edited Capetown (April 19, 2014 11:32:00)

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#7 April 22, 2014 01:30:00

rogerhoward
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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


Shouldn't maintenance costs be less for EVs with no gear box, less moving parts and less complex machinery to go wrong generally, or is anyone aware of some report to the contrary for us to read?


I've no idea of depreciation rates of either high emission vehicles or electric vehicles let alone comparing them, but I'd certainly be “all ears” about the implied zero-depreciation rate of phoenix's new high emissions car.


Nor have I looked into battery longevity, beyond a 100,000 miles “thus far” experience that I've now read on http://experiencenissanleaf.co.uk . Can you point us in the direction of the reports of those early batteries for us to avoid, Capetown?


As regards battery performance degradation, I understand that LEAF owners warranty in any case nowadays retrospectively gaurantees the car battery to at least 9 out of 12 bars of its capacity (approximately 70 per cent) after 5 years or 100,000 kilometres, whichever comes first.


The Electric Car Guide has a section 1.24 “How long will the battery last in my EV?” The caravanning community seem to expect a much larger number of recharges for their Lithium Ion batteries though.


I'm afraid that, whether it's for a battery or anything else, I have a rather jaundiced experience of insurance and I generally prefer to take on the risk of failure/replacement myself unless there is some specific reason to do otherwise. How expensive can a 24kWh battery be? As you seem to know more than me about this, Capetown, what would you say?


For all those here who seem accostomed to the luxury of a new vehicle, My Electric Avenue currently have an offer on of a new Nissan Leaf for £15800. Personally I'll have to wait until secondhand prices are down to my level though.


P.S. How many people really do clock over 100 miles to get to work regularly anyway?







Economy 10 tariff provides 6.9p/kWh off-peak import between 12am-5am, 1pm-4pm and 8pm-10pm; http://www.pvoutput.org/aggregate.jsp?id=21047&sid=18934&v=2&t=m on approx. 63% off-peak usage, 22% solar usage, and 15% peak-rate usage.
1,900kWh annually is exported, mostly in summer, on approx. 3,200kWh generation. Approx. 4,500kWh/year is imported, mostly for (a) winter and springtime off-peak Storage Heaters, and (b) off-peak hot water Immersion heating (which is “dumb”, i.e. not linked to the solar PV).
PV array is split East-West. Income is from Phase II 21p/kWh Feed-in-Tariff plus smart metered 3.2p/kWh Export Tariff.

Edited rogerhoward (April 22, 2014 01:30:00)

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#8 May 8, 2014 10:21:00

rogerhoward
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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


The comments that this thread initially attracted last year I had expected an actual EV owner to respond to, on the assumption of some cross-membership between the EV community and the Solar PV community due to the two applications being complementary. I know that my motoring mileage is pretty low throughout the winter, on the face of it making EVs potentially quite solar-friendly.


Anyway, the government's Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) funding pot isn't yet exhausted apparently, and although not well publicised you can still get free recharging points from each of the ‘big six’ retail energy suppliers (regardless of whether you are a customer of theirs), as well as direct from Chargemaster themselves; http://www.chargemasterplc.com/index.php/free_homecharge_offer


When my installer - one of only 3 in the country - eventually arrived last year though, he did say that this was the first solar PV home that he'd installed at, and that instead of it being PV households getting these free recharging points he thought it was mostly existing EV owners having them installed at their family members' homes. It seemed sad even then that solar PV'd properties had missed out on the limited OLEV funding pot.


A local friend also with solar PV has followed my example in having one installed, but he commented that he was completely unaware of this current freebie.


If anyone has an urban home that they want to get up to an economic low-energy standard, for example for renting-out purposes in future, now's the time as regards this freebie I'd say. This isn't the 20th century any more, even in poor old backward blighty with our slow EV take-up.










Economy 10 tariff provides 6.9p/kWh off-peak import between 12am-5am, 1pm-4pm and 8pm-10pm; http://www.pvoutput.org/aggregate.jsp?id=21047&sid=18934&v=2&t=m on approx. 63% off-peak usage, 22% solar usage, and 15% peak-rate usage.
1,900kWh annually is exported, mostly in summer, on approx. 3,200kWh generation. Approx. 4,500kWh/year is imported, mostly for (a) winter and springtime off-peak Storage Heaters, and (b) off-peak hot water Immersion heating (which is “dumb”, i.e. not linked to the solar PV).
PV array is split East-West. Income is from Phase II 21p/kWh Feed-in-Tariff plus smart metered 3.2p/kWh Export Tariff.

Edited rogerhoward (May 8, 2014 10:21:00)

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#9 July 17, 2014 12:14:00

Rick M
Registered: 2012-03-22
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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


Hi Yotty, Just reading up on this subject


Re using standard 13A domestic power socket to recharge EV, the Go Ultra Low website warns that most of these are unsuitable because the circuits are not intended to carry that much power. The site is a joint production of the government and Society of Motor Manufacturers Traders (SMMT) but this does ring true to me because heavy power using appliances (such as my electric hob oven) do have dedicated circuits with noticeably thicker electric cables. www.goultralow.com





Edited Rick M (July 17, 2014 12:14:00)

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#10 July 22, 2014 15:19:00

Lyreslider
Registered: 2012-03-13
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Free Vehicle Recharging Points.


We had the relation of a neighbour in our village installing these all round us a week or so ago. They assessed our garage for a fast charging point. Sadly the cable from the house some 25 metres away was not considered up to the power being transmitted and it would quite some expense to lay new cable underground. We gathered the free installations his firm (Harvey Electrical Services of Darlington) are contracted to install run till the end of August, or until they run out.





Edited Lyreslider (July 22, 2014 15:19:00)

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